Working With Families

Amicus is committed to working with local authorities and the families and professionals involved with the child. We have a successful history of being able to fulfil contracts and offer sustainable placements with outstanding outcomes for children.

A major aspect of the Amicus therapeutic programme is to make links and work with all those groups and individuals that interact significantly with the child or young person. Where appropriate the child or young person’s parents whether birth, adoptive or foster, form the cornerstone of this endeavour and Amicus will build a working partnership with them; the aim where possible being to facilitate the eventual integration of the child or young person into family life.

Maintaining contact

A vital part of any effective work in this area is to support and maintain contact between the child or young person and their parents/carers and other significant people, especially siblings. The work varies according to the needs of the child or young person and their parents/carers and follows the details of their individual placement plans, which is written in consultation with the relevant people.

Research findings highlighted for example in the Utting report, point to the ‘desirability, where possible, of maintaining parental contacts and continuing to work with families’ of children and young people placed in care. It is important therefore that these families/parents/carers are engaged, where appropriate, in any work with the child or young person and are helped to be supportive of any changes. Part of this may be to help some parents to address and work through their own difficulties and often traumatic past experiences.

maintaining-contactAmicus will draw up a program of work with the child or young person’s parents/carers. This is designed around the specific needs of the particular parents and child or young person. This work will include:

  • practical support for the family
  • assistance in the maintenance of contact
  • therapeutic input for both child and family
  • support for the parents’/carers’ appropriate involvement in the child’s care
  • help for families to be supportive of any changes in their child

 

Where possible this allows the children and young people’s eventual integration into their parents’/carers’ care. Where this is not the case it may still have the potential to facilitate a healthier or less conflictual relationship than perhaps existed previously; one that enables the parents and child or young person to at least relate to each other in the future in a way that is less dysfunctional or damaging to the child or young person’s potential for a more healthy development. An important aspect of this may be to help those involved to come to terms with more realistic expectations around their relationships, therefore not hindering the child or young person’s growth through idealised and false hopes.